Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2014
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Interim financial information
Interim financial information– The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and notes required by GAAP for annual financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal accruals, considered necessary for a fair presentation of the interim financial statements have been included. Results for the three months ended March 31, 2014 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2014.
 
The condensed consolidated financial statements and notes should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes for the year ended December 31, 2013 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 15, 2014.
Basis of consolidation
Basis of consolidation The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, SG Building and SG Brazil. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated.
Accounting estimates
Accounting estimates – The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Significant areas which require the Company to make estimates include revenue recognition, stock-based compensation, warrant liabilities and allowance for doubtful accounts.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.
 
Operating cycle
Operating cycle – The length of the Company’s contracts varies, but is typically between six to twelve months. Assets and liabilities relating to long-term contracts are included in current assets and current liabilities in the accompanying balance sheets as they will be liquidated in the normal course of contract completion, which at times could exceed one year.
 
Revenue recognition
Revenue recognition– The Company accounts for its long-term contracts associated with the design, engineering, manufacture and project management of building projects and related services, using the percentage-of-completion accounting method. Under this method, revenue is recognized based on the extent of progress towards completion of the long-term contract. The Company uses the cost to cost basis because management considers it to be the best available measure of progress on these contracts.
 
Contract costs include all direct material and labor costs and those indirect costs related to contract performance. General and administrative costs, marketing and business development expenses and pre-project expenses are charged to expense as incurred. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions, and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. An amount equal to contract costs attributable to claims is included in revenue when realization is probable and the amount can be reliably estimated.
 
The asset, “Costs and estimated earnings in excess of billing on uncompleted contracts,” represents revenue recognized in excess of amounts billed. The liability, “Billings in excess of costs and estimated earnings on uncompleted contracts,” represents billing in excess of revenue recognized.
 
The Company offers a one-year warranty on completed contracts.  For the three months ended March 31, 2014, the Company recognized $1,275 in warranty claims. The Company does not anticipate that any additional claims are likely to occur for warranties that are currently outstanding. Accordingly, no warranty reserve is considered necessary for any of the periods presented.
 
The Company also supplies repurposed containers to its customers. In these cases, the Company serves as a supplier to its customers for standard and made to order products that it sells at fixed prices.  Revenue from these contracts is generally recognized when the products have been delivered to the customer, accepted by the customer and collection is reasonably assured.  Revenue is recognized upon completion of the following: an order for product is received from a customer; written approval for the payment schedule is received from the customer and the corresponding required deposit or payments are received; a common carrier signs documentation accepting responsibility for the unit as agent for the customer; and the unit is delivered to the customer’s receiving point. The title and risk of loss passes to the customer at the customer’s receiving point.
 
Amounts billed to customers in a sales transaction for shipping and handling are classified as revenue.  Products sold are generally paid for based on schedules provided for in each individual customer contract including upfront deposits and progress payments as products are being manufactured.
 
Funds received in advance of meeting the criteria for revenue recognition are deferred and are recorded as revenue when they are earned.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents– The Company considers cash and cash equivalents to include all short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and have original maturities of three months or less upon acquisition.
Short-term investment
Short-term investment– The Company classifies its investment consisting of a certificate of deposit with a maturity greater than three months but less than one year as short-term investment.
Accounts receivable
Accounts receivable– Accounts receivable are receivables generated from sales to customers and progress billings on performance type contracts. Amounts included in accounts receivable are deemed to be collectible within the Company’s operating cycle. Management provides an allowance for doubtful accounts based on the Company’s historical losses, specific customer circumstances, and general economic conditions. Periodically, management reviews accounts receivable and adjusts the allowance based on current circumstances and charges off uncollectible receivables when all attempts to collect have been exhausted and the prospects for recovery are remote.
 
The Company has a factoring agreement which provides for the Company to receive an advance of 75% of any accounts receivable that it factors. On August 13, 2012, the factoring agreement was increased for up to $1,000,000 for credit worthy retail clients. The factoring agreement also provides for discount fees ranging from 2.5% to 7.5% of the face value of any accounts receivable factored. The factoring agreement is with recourse except in an instance which the customer is insolvent. The agreement expires January 2015. The agreement will continue to automatically extend for successive periods of one year unless either party formally cancels. For the period ended March 31, 2104 and the year ended December 31, 2013 there has been no activity with regard to this agreement. Under the convertible debentures agreement as described in Note 7, the Company is precluded from any borrowing under this factoring agreement.
Inventory
Inventory– Raw construction materials (primarily shipping containers) are valued at the lower of costs (first-in, first-out method) or market. Finished goods and work-in-process inventories are valued at the lower of costs or market, using the specific identification method. As of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, work-in-process inventory amounted to $28,450 and $34,052, respectively.
Debt issuance costs
Debt issuance costsAll debt issuances are stated at cost, net of amortization. Amortization is computed over the estimated useful life of the related assets on an effective interest method.
Convertible instruments
Convertible instruments – The Company bifurcates conversion options from their host instruments and accounts for them as free standing derivative financial instruments according to certain criteria. The criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instrument are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, (b) the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under otherwise applicable generally accepted accounting principles with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument.
 
The Company has determined that the embedded conversion options should be bifurcated from their host instruments and a portion of the proceeds received upon the issuance of the hybrid contract have been allocated to the fair value of the derivative. The derivative is subsequently marked to market at each reporting date based on current fair value, with the changes in fair value reported in results of operations.
Common stock purchase warrants and other derivative financial instruments
Common stock purchase warrants and other derivative financial instruments – The Company classifies as equity any contracts that (i) require physical settlement or net-share settlement or (ii) provides a choice of net-cash settlement or settlement in the Company’s own shares (physical settlement or net-share settlement) providing that such contracts are indexed to the Company’s own stock. The Company classifies as assets or liabilities any contracts that (i) require net-cash settlement (including a requirement to net cash settle the contract if any event occurs and if that event is outside the Company’s control) or (ii) gives the counterparty a choice of net-cash settlement of settlement shares (physical settlement or net-cash settlement). The Company assesses classification of common stock purchase warrants and other free standing derivatives at each reporting date to determine whether a change in classification between assets and liabilities or equity is required.
 
The Company’s free standing derivatives consist of warrants to purchase common stock that were issued to a placement agent involved with the private offering memorandum as well as issuances of convertible debentures as described in Note 9 . The Company evaluated the common stock purchase warrants to assess their proper classification in the condensed consolidated balance sheet and determined that the common stock purchase warrants feature a characteristic permitting cash settlement at the option of the holder. Accordingly, these instruments have been classified as warrant liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets as of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013.
 
Fair value measurements
Fair value measurements– Financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities are carried at cost, which the Company believes approximates fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments.
 
The Company measures the fair value of financial assets and liabilities based on the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. The Company maximized the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value.
 
The Company uses three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:
 
Level 1
Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities
Level 2
Quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable.
Level 3
Inputs that are unobservable (for example, cash flow modeling inputs based on assumptions).
 
Financial liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below:
 
   
March 31,
2014
   
Quoted
prices in
active market
for identical
assets
(Level l)
   
Significant
other
observable
inputs
(Level 2)
   
Significant
unobservable
inputs
(Level 3)
 
Warrant Liabilities
 
$
295,336
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
295,336
 
Conversion Option Liabilities
   
2,490
     
-
     
-
     
2,490
 
   
$
297,826
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
297,826
 
 
   
December 31,
2013
   
Quoted
prices in
active market
for identical
assets
(Level l)
   
Significant
other
observable
inputs
(Level 2)
   
Significant
unobservable
inputs
(Level 3)
 
Warrant Liabilities
 
$
214,738
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
214,738
 
Conversion Option Liabilities
   
2,873
     
-
     
-
     
2,873
 
   
$
217,611
   
$
-
   
$
-
   
$
217,611
 
 
Warrant and conversion option liabilities are measured at fair value using the lattice pricing model and are classified within Level 3 of the valuation hierarchy. For fair value measurements categorized within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, the Company’s Chief Financial Officer, who reports to the Chief Executive Officer, determines its valuation policies and procedures. The development and determination of the unobservable inputs for Level 3 fair value measurements and fair value calculations are the responsibility of the Company’s Chief Financial Officer and are approved by the Chief Executive Officer.
 
The following table sets forth a summary of the changes in the fair value of the Company’s Level 3 financial liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis:
 
   
For the
three months
ended
March 31,
2014
   
For the
three months
ended
March 31,
2013
 
Beginning balance
 
$
217,611
   
$
406,557
 
Aggregate fair value of conversion option liabilities and warrants issued
   
-
     
94,255
 
Change in fair value of conversion option liabilities and warrants
   
80,215
     
(219,495
Ending balance
 
$
297,826
   
$
281,317
 
 
The significant assumptions and valuation methods that the Company used to determine fair value and the change in fair value of the Company’s derivative financial instruments are discussed in Notes 7 and 9.
 
The Company presented warrant and conversion option liabilities at fair value on its condensed consolidated balance sheets, with the corresponding changes in fair value recorded in the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of operations for the applicable reporting periods. As disclosed in Notes 7 and 9, the Company computed the fair value of the warrant and conversion option liability at the date of issuance and the reporting dates of March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013 using the lattice pricing method.
 
The calculation of the lattice pricing model involves the use of the fair value of the Company’s common stock, estimated term, volatility, risk-free interest rates, the size of the time step and dividend yield (if applicable). The Company developed the assumptions that were used as follows: The fair value of the Company’s common stock was obtained from publicly quoted prices as well as valuation models developed by the Company. The results of the valuation were assessed for reasonableness by comparing such amount to sales of other equity and equity linked securities to unrelated parties for cash and intervening events affected in the price of the Company’s stock. The term represents the remaining contractual term of the derivative; the volatility rate was developed based on analysis of the Company’s historical stock price volatility and the historical volatility rates of several other similarly situated companies (using a number of observations that was at least equal to or exceeded the number of observations in the life of the derivative financial instrument at issue); the risk free interest rates were obtained from publicly available US Treasury yield curve rates; the dividend yield is zero because the Company has not paid dividends and does not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. The size of the time step is used to determine the up ratio and down ratio probabilities applied in the lattice model and are proportional to the remaining term of the derivative instrument.
Share-based payments
Share-based payments – The Company measures the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award. For employees and directors, the fair value of the award is measured on the grant date and for non-employees, the fair value of the award is generally re-measured on interim financial reporting dates and vesting dates until the service period is complete. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. The Company recognizes stock-based compensation expense on a graded-vesting basis over the requisite service period for each separately vesting tranche of each award. Stock-based compensation expense is reported within operating expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.
 
Income taxes
Income taxes – The Company accounts for income taxes utilizing the asset and liability approach.  Under this approach, deferred taxes represent the future tax consequences expected to occur when the reported amounts of assets and liabilities are recovered or paid.  The provision for income taxes generally represents income taxes paid or payable for the current year plus the change in deferred taxes during the year.  Deferred taxes result from the differences between the financial and tax bases of the Company’s assets and liabilities and are adjusted for changes in tax rates and tax laws when changes are enacted.
 
The calculation of tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax regulations.  The Company recognizes liabilities for anticipated tax audit issues based on the Company’s estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes will be due.  If payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when the liabilities are no longer determined to be necessary.  If the estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result.
 
The Company recognizes deferred tax liabilities and assets for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the condensed consolidated financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax liabilities and assets are determined based on the difference between the financial statement basis and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. The Company estimates the degree to which tax assets and credit carryforwards will result in a benefit based on expected profitability by tax jurisdiction. A valuation allowance for such tax assets and loss carryforwards is provided when it is determined to be more likely than not that the benefit of such deferred tax asset will not be realized in future periods.  If it becomes more likely than not that a tax asset will be used, the related valuation allowance on such assets would be reduced.
 
Concentrations of credit risk
Concentrations of credit risk – Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentration of credit risk, consist principally of cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash with high credit quality institutions. At times, such amounts may be in excess of the FDIC insurance limits.  The Company has not experienced any losses in such account and believes that it is not exposed to any significant credit risk on the account.
 
With respect to receivables, concentrations of credit risk are limited to a few customers in the construction industry.  The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers’ financial condition and, generally, requires no collateral from its customers other than normal lien rights.  At March 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, 75% and 87%, respectively, of the Company’s accounts receivable were due from three and two customers, respectively.
 
Revenue relating to two and three customers, respectively, represented approximately 88% and 81% of the Company’s total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
 
Costs of revenue relating to one vendor, who is a related party and disclosed in Note 12, represented approximately 23% and 39% of the Company’s total cost of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Cost of revenue relating to one and two unrelated vendors, respectively, represented approximately 67% and 40% of the Company’s total cost of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The Company believes it has access to alternative suppliers, with limited disruption to the business, should circumstances change with its existing suppliers.